Sunday, April 17, 2005

Asking for the blessing of St. Adiposa

Back in the '60's a little-known book called "St. Fidgeta" was published. My father dearly loved this little book which was authored by a Catholic and was a gentle satire of the haigiographies he had been exposed to growing up and attending Catholic schools. Daddy's Catholic friends thought it was hysterical and even though he was a staunch Presbyterian, he knew enough about the Catholic church to be greatly amused by it .

I was searching my bookshelves today, trying to find this little volume, to no avail. I thought I had gotten my hands on it after my father died, but apparently not. I was looking for the essay on "Saint Adiposa".

Saint Adiposa was one of my favorites. She decided that a life intentionally cut short by overweight could be consecrated to God, so she retreated to her cell and ate continuously until she died when the floor collapsed and was declared a martyr to caloric immolation. She was famous for her poetry where she compared the Holy Spirit to a fig, a cake, a whortleberry and other comestibles.

My sister-in-law and I were commiserating today about the changes age brings to your figure. We needed the consolation of Saint Adiposa! Deliver us, Saint Adiposa from the desire to reclaim our girlish figures. Grant us consolation in the your four blessed food groups: caffeine, chocolate, fat and sugar.

St. Fidgeta, by the way, was the patron saint of wiggly children. It is said that she fidgeted so much in her desire to go to mass that her pagan tutor slapped her to death in frustration ;-).

5 comments:

SpookyRach said...

Sounds like a great book! I will have to light candles to St. Adiposa from now on.

Whortleberry? What the heck is that? It makes me chortle very

much.

Songbird said...

I am laughing. Really. Out loud, even.

John said...

If it's not at your local library, perhaps you could order it through interlibrary loan. According to WorldCat, there are 284 copies in the U.S. It shouldn't be too hard to acquire it.

John said...

If it's not at your local library, perhaps you could order it through interlibrary loan. According to WorldCat, there are 284 copies in the U.S. It shouldn't be too hard to acquire it.

Quotidian Grace said...

John, thanks for the information. A friend found a copy for me on a used book website.